I'M TIRED OF RELYING ON A FUCKING GOOGLE SEARCH TO REMEMBER HOW TO WRITE THAT NICHE PIECE OF CODE, so I made a BLOG

I'm also tired of...

OTHER CODERS WRITING SHITTY TUTORIALS THAT TAKE FOREVER AND, IN THE END, don't work AND WASTE MY FUCKING TIME. So I created my own shitty tutorials ON THIS SHITTY BLOG, but at least I admit that my posts are SHITTY, and they help me BUT NOT YOU

ALSO PLEASE NOTE - my site loaded **Dayyyyyyyyum** fast.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - ^^ LOL THOUGHT ME HAD THE MARKDOWN

GOOGLE DOESN'T THINK MY SITE IS MOBILE FRIENDLY. IT ISN'T FRIENDLY ON DESKTOP EITHER. BUT IT IS RESPONSIVE SIR GOOGLE

I MADE TWO H1 TAGS UP THERE BECuZ IM TARGETING THE MADDEST LONG-TAIL KEYWORD STRANGS YOU EVER SEEN. I read that on an SEO Blog - POST DATED 2005.

Coding can allow you to live a remarkable life. Work from anywhere in the world and earn a high rate of pay. BUT... learning to code is a GIANT pain in the ass. And here is why I think so...

It is a giant pain in the ass because when you learn to code, there is an ever expanding amount of stuff you're required to learn. I think after I learn this, I'll have arrived. But when I arrive at that point, I find there is yet another thing to learn. And once I learn that, I think maybe now I'll have arrived. But then I realize I've forgotten that thing I learned 30 days ago and I need to relearn it. And it makes me a little depressed because I never really get to a point where I'm really proficient with my code. Which means Miley Cyrus was right when she was 16 years old and sang "The Climb", and that you need to enjoy the journey because you either never make it or learning aspect. But some may argue she was even more right when she sang, "Wrecking ball", where when you have a bad day it's better to blow some shit up.

It seems like there is no way to know everything you need to know about coding. And to help speed up your learning you find these programs that say, "Learn to code in 30 days." Or bootcamps that want you to spend 10k that claim you'll be job ready after graduating. Most of it is bullshit. Because all these programs leave giant fucking holes in your knowledge, things that just simply take time to learn. And how do you know how to fill in the gaps? Do I fill in the gaps by... writing code? writing working code? Writing maintainable code? Writing testable code? Well, it's kind of all about that, and kind of about none of that. It all comes down to learning solid principles. Coding is less about writing code, but having solid principles for solving problems, and bootcamps DO NOT TEACH PRINCIPLES.

But what other options are out there to learn how to code? Am I going to help you? No, not at all. The bottom line in this blog is I think a lot of tutorials out there are complete shit. And, mine are not different. Because tutorials take time, effort and are practically impossible to maintain as technology evolves and as your tutorial base grows. An amazing tutorial today will be complete shit in a year.

And so as a noob, how do we manage the need of producing code with the need of learning new things that are ever changing? It's gotta come down to principles and how you tackle problems. And that's the problem with Bootcamps, they do not teach principles. They teach you very specific and highly specialized things. You may be functional if you encounter a similar problem as one you've encountered in the bootcamp. But if that problem changes, or if you experience something you haven't encountered before, you've got your thumb up your ass. For example, you went to a bootcamp that focused on rails 4.2 and ruby, and so when rails 5.0 comes out and it changes everything you learned in rails 4.2... what do you have to go back on? You can't go back to the tutorials that helped you out before. They're all outdated. Here's another problem with the tutorials out there. They're typically written by people who understand the principles of programming, and when that happens, they skip over stuff that may not make sense to a noob. They skim over stuff that shit, and then a noob who doesn't understand principles is completely lost.

My posts have no intention of helping you, only me! But I will say, it's practically impossible for a noob to figure out even how to deploy a simple node.js application to heroku. The amount of shit that goes into a starter application if you want to be a fully functioning application is insane. Absolutely insane. Impossible to comprehend. Seriously, it's fucking fucked up. It's not simple anymore, and if anyone can make it simple again, they will succeed.

Keys to becoming a Coder

Additional Keys to becoming a coder

1. Manage Knowledge Regression What the FUCK is knowledge regression. A great question. That's when you learn something and then forget it. It happens all the time to me in coding. It is what happens when you jam code at a problem until it works. You get it working, 3 months later you encounter the same problem, you go through the SAME PAIN. It's the most frustrating thing. So you need to develop your own way of learning and remembering what you've learned. This way you can put that in your knowledge cap, and unleash it at will. Rather than relying on google or some other server. Even if you aren't fast, if you can do a lot, it's worth it. If you're doing a live coding event... or going through code... it's MUCH MORE EFFECTIVE TO ACTUALLY GO THROUGH THE CODE IN THE CONSOLE WITH A CONCRETE EXAMPLE.